RMSC Athlete Bursary Recipient: Tessa Breaker
By Morgan Rogers, Fast and Female Ambassador and Event Support Coordinator

Morgan Rogers and Tessa Breaker at the Rocky Mountain Soap Women’s Run, 2019

The 2019 edition of the Fast and Female Girl’s Run, in partnership with the Rocky Mountain Soap Company Women’s Run, went off with a bang! As part of the race weekend, Fast and Female and Rocky Mountain Soap Company partner up to award a bursary to a female athlete from the Bow Valley who is living our shared values and inspiring others as part of their journey. Past recipients include climber Becca Frangos and cyclist Sara Poidevin. This year, we were excited to work together with Canmore Collegiate High School (CCHS) to find an outstanding candidate for the 2019 bursary.

It is a pleasure to introduce this year’s bursary recipient, CCHS student and hockeyplayer, Tessa Breaker! Tessa is an extremely dedicated and hardworking grade 11 student, who inspires us all with her ability to balance athletics and academics. In her acceptance speech, Tessa shared that hockey is a big part of her life and it has helped her reach her goals by giving her motivation and confidence. Through pursuing her hockey goals and aiming to attend university, Tessa hopes to inspire girls in her community to get involved in sport and graduate high school. Talk about a R.E.A.L (Relatable Empowered Athletic Leader) role model! Tessa says her bursary will be used for transportation to hockey, one of greatest barriers to participation.

We are proud to welcome Tessa to the Fast and Female family and look forward to seeing her at a future events inspiring girls to stay healthy and active in sports!

Tessa Breaker’s acceptance speach, Rocky Mountain Soap Women’s Run Award, 2019

Read Tessa’s Full Story:
Via the Rocky Mountain Soap Company Women’s Run Blog

My name is Tessa Breaker. I come from the Stoney Nakoda and Siksika Nations. I grew up in Morley, but went to school in Exshaw and am currently in Grade 12 at Canmore Collegiate High School. 

I started playing hockey when I was twelve years old. That year I didn’t make the Bantam team. Instead, I was put into Peewee. That whole Peewee year, I trained really hard. My dad helped me train every night. He took me to practice at outdoor rinks and we worked on my skills. We practiced a lot! Some weekends, I would skate for the entire day on the lake by my house in Morley. I would skate for seven or more hours, only stopping to eat.  All the hard worked paid off. 

The next year, I made the Bantam team in Cochrane! I scored lots of goals and my points average was consistently going up. The next year, I played on teams in Strathmore and Siksika. By my third year, I was dominating, and this year I finished as top scorer on my Siksika team. I also started my Junior debut as an underage Junior player in a March Madness Tournament in Siksika

This Spring, I was selected to play in the Oskana Cup, a tournament for Indigenous athletes that is hosted in Saskatchewan.  It has just recently been opened up to female athletes and on May 3-5th I got to represent Piikani Nation, a Blackfoot Team. Even though our team lost in the semis, it was an awesome experience and great for my development. We had a lot of fun playing together for the first time and went home with a bronze medal.

Tessa Breaker in action, 2019

Hockey has become a big part of my life and has helped me reach my goals by giving me motivation and confidence. When I’m not playing hockey, I volunteer my time to work at the daycare in Morley and to be a mentor and support at Canmore Collegiate for Grade 8 Indigenous students.I am lucky to have wonderful parents who take me to practices every day, drive me across Alberta and pay for all my hockey fees. Even with that support, transportation to hockey has always been a challenge for me and my family, since I live so far away from all the teams I have played for. Siksika is quite a long drive from Morley (2.5 hours). I am so grateful for the Rocky Mountain Soap bursary – I will be putting it towards covering the cost of transportation to practices and tournaments.

After I graduate from high school, I hope to head to university to pursue biology or education and continue to play hockey wherever I go. I hope that by playing competitive hockey, graduating high school and going on to university that I can be a role model who inspires other young girls in my community to get involved in sport and finish school.